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Thread: Should I purchase Ren Wax?

  1. #1
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    Should I purchase Ren Wax?

    I've never heard of Ren Wax but have seen several people use it here. It sounds like a good idea but I just wanted to get some feedback. Thanks! - Steve
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  2. #2
    Veteran Member Bucknut's Avatar
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    I have never heard of Ren Wax. I do use paraffin wax on my Indians if they are in good shape. I just rub a little on them and it gives them a nice shine and helps protect them from corrosion.

    What is Ren Wax used for?
    Detectors I use: Minelab Etrac & Equinox 800
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucknut View Post
    I have never heard of Ren Wax. I do use paraffin wax on my Indians if they are in good shape. I just rub a little on them and it gives them a nice shine and helps protect them from corrosion.

    What is Ren Wax used for?
    I believe it's used for basically the same thing?
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  4. #4
    I have heard great things about it. Here is some information about Renaissance Wax:

    http://www.restorationproduct.com/renwaxinfo.html
    Lifetime totals:
    8 Large Cents, 378 Indian Heads, 2 Two Cent Pieces, 1 Capped Bust Half Dime, 1 Seated Half Dime, 9 Shield Nickels, 67 V Nickels, 121 Buffalo Nickels, 31 War Nickels, 16 Seated Dimes, 127 Barber Dimes, 382 Mercury Dimes, 233 Rosies, 4 Seated Quarters, 15 Barber Quarters, 17 Standing Liberty Quarters, 84 Silver Washingtons, 1 Seated Half, 3 Barber Halves, 16 Walking Liberty Halves

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Two-Cent View Post
    I have heard great things about it. Here is some information about Renaissance Wax:

    http://www.restorationproduct.com/renwaxinfo.html
    Thanks Tony it sounds awesome! I think I'll get some!
    Equipment: ​Whites XLT

  6. #6
    That's a good question. I've read about it but never used. Definitely interested to hear if anyone has had success with it.

  7. #7
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    Ren -wax or Renaissance Wax is a brand of micro crystaline wax polish that is widely encountered in antique restorations and museum curation. Although not appropriate for all materials, it is known to and used by almost every collection. It is also used as a primary finish for cabinetry and furniture. Renaissance wax is also used by reenactors of historic swordsmanship to protect armour and weapons. It is widely recognised that this substance is more protective and longer lasting than oil, especially for swords and helmets that are frequently touched by human hands.

    I have been using it now on coins and relics now for about 4 or 5 years now , it doesn't clean the item you cover but only preserves it from re-rusting or re-corroding an oxidizing. I like the results as it doesn't make the item look unnatural color-wise and a little can of the stuff will last you a long time . I've heard paraffin wax will do the same thing although there is probably less hassle or mess using the ren- wax.
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  8. #8
    Global Moderator OxShoeDrew's Avatar
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    I use it on coppers that need side light to capture the details. It makes the coin look "wet" when dry. Yeah, I agree with Dan, I think I've done 75 coins and many buttons with one small can...and I have lots left. Really smells though....windows open or my wife yells

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    Quote Originally Posted by OxShoeDrew View Post
    I use it on coppers that need side light to capture the details. It makes the coin look "wet" when dry. Yeah, I agree with Dan, I think I've done 75 coins and many buttons with one small can...and I have lots left. Really smells though....windows open or my wife yells
    I'll keep the smell in mind! Sure don't want to tick my wife off! Happy wife happy life!
    Equipment: ​Whites XLT

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by del View Post
    Ren -wax or Renaissance Wax is a brand of micro crystaline wax polish that is widely encountered in antique restorations and museum curation. Although not appropriate for all materials, it is known to and used by almost every collection. It is also used as a primary finish for cabinetry and furniture. Renaissance wax is also used by reenactors of historic swordsmanship to protect armour and weapons. It is widely recognised that this substance is more protective and longer lasting than oil, especially for swords and helmets that are frequently touched by human hands.

    I have been using it now on coins and relics now for about 4 or 5 years now , it doesn't clean the item you cover but only preserves it from re-rusting or re-corroding an oxidizing. I like the results as it doesn't make the item look unnatural color-wise and a little can of the stuff will last you a long time . I've heard paraffin wax will do the same thing although there is probably less hassle or mess using the ren- wax.
    Dan, would it work on pewter buttons?

  11. #11
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chief5709 View Post
    Dan, would it work on pewter buttons?
    Brian , the key to pewter buttons is to seal them before they dry out and crack , then flake apart from the outside edges inward . I wouldn't recommend applying ren wax to it if it has rough exposed edges as it would be difficult to cover all the nooks and deep crannies plus your likely to disturb or break off the edges more.

    when I'm in the field and come across a pewter item or button , i place it into a small ziploc baggy with the moist dirt that was from the holes or plug. then when i get home i"ll quickly rinse and lightly brush the dirt off under the faucet . pewter usually cleans up pretty well and then i place it into an elmer's glue and water mixture (it looks like milk when properly mixed) let it soak for about a half hour so the solution gets deep into the object . then I take it out and place it on a hard surface and let dry then i will place it back into the mixture for another half hour and let dry again .

    I suppose at this point (after sealing it internally and externally ) you could apply the wax now to give it even more of a stable outer surface.
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  12. #12
    I have invested in the renwax two months ago. It was only $14 for the big can on amazon. Olive oil didn't last too long on a dandy button for some reason. The renwax does give it a slight shine. And like Dan, I been putting it on large cents that I have dug recently.

    Quote Originally Posted by del View Post
    then when i get home i"ll quickly rinse and lightly brush the dirt off under the faucet . pewter usually cleans up pretty well and then i place it into an elmer's glue and water mixture (it looks like milk when properly mixed) let it soak for about a half hour so the solution gets deep into the object . then I take it out and place it on a hard surface and let dry then i will place it back into the mixture for another half hour and let dry again.
    Thanks for the tip. Now all I need to do is dig a pewter button. I can find 1 pewter spoon handle, and lead, but no pewter buttons. idk...

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