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Thread: Before @ after pics of LC

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  1. #1
    Full Member Robbie's Avatar
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    Before @ after pics of LC

    Here`s ,my results using electrolysis. It was pretty much toasted, but it looks like 1816. I was hoping to have gotten better results.
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  2. #2
    Elite Member Digger_O'Dell's Avatar
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    I found that electrolysis on copper coins often does more damage than good-at least in my experience. I know some have had really good luck with hot peroxide but I have not tried that yet personally. What I have done with my LCs that has worked wonders has been using a lye dip. Anywhere from a few hours to even a couple days maybe. It strips off the crud, but leaves the patina intact. I actually used an ultrasonic cleaner first for a short time to loosed the big chunks and remove the surface dirt. One warning I will give about ultrasonic cleaners is on porous coins, it will clean out every little pore and hole leaving a dull grey finish. The thick chocolate brown patina will also come off if left too long.

    Once cleaned, best to use Renaissance Wax or equivalent to seal the coin and give it a bit of a sheen again.
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  3. #3
    Elite Member The Rebel's Avatar
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    The best cleaning method for coppers is not to use electrolysis or chemicals, as you're stripping off the top layer. That top layer is the only thing keeping the detail together.

    1. Dry brush and use a toothpick to get rid of some stubborn crud. Then rinse / soak in warm water & repeated if needed.
    2. Coat with Renaissance Wax
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  4. #4
    Full Member Robbie's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I`m still learning. She`s still setting in olive oil(hoping to replenish it). I`ve tried the hot peroxide on IH`s before without much luck. It depends on the soil outtake with a type of metal. I`m happy to get a date off of it.She was toast to begin with. I`m not getting anything off the back(other than the reed).
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  5. #5
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    I've seen copper coins cleaned nice with electrolysis , although the coppers were not very bad to begin with and the person used very very low current and for not very long either . there are a few ways to re-tone the copper coin after you've stripped off the patina .

    Robbie I don't think you did a bad job at all , you have to have a decent coin to begin with to make "beautiful" and that one looked rough from the get go . These types of coppers are perfect for experimenting and honing you cleaning skills . well done

    Dan
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    so don't expect it from cheap people"

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  6. #6
    Yeah, if you are going to play, play with a toasted one. Rub a little brown shoe polish on that thing for a very quick and dirty re-toning. Can't hurt it.
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  7. #7
    Ave! Never, ever, use electrolysis on such coins, my friends. Too harsh and much too invasive to the coin's fragile patina. DW soaks and tooth brushing, in such cases, are your best friend. Best, Kevin

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