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Thread: When to put on wax

  1. #1

    When to put on wax

    Hi all - need your opinions on when to apply RenWax. I just got some and seem to procrastinate on when to apply. I had found a civil war token and a exempt WWI button/token (still not sure) that I would like to preserve. Both of these items have some dirt on them, mostly crusty stuff that I likely could remove, but it wouldn't show the detail as well.

    Is it ok to apply the wax over the crusty dirt and it would be preserved?

    Thanks all! Happy Hunting to all of you.
    Garrett AT Pro, Garrett Waterproof Pinpointer, CTX3030 with 6,11,17" coils.

  2. #2
    Global Moderator OxShoeDrew's Avatar
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    Good question! I did hear someone say Renwax is easily removed...so it's not a permanent coating. I hope someone chimes in with exact info.

  3. #3
    I put Ren Wax on top of crusty dirty coppers all the time. Often if you remove the crusty dirt, you are removing any remaining detail. Ren wax will help keep that last bit of detail intact.
    Oldest find: 5,000 year old copper spearhead
    Oldest coin: 1699 William III halfpenny
    Purdiest coin: 1832 Capped Bust quarter
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    "He who would search for pearls must dive below."

  4. #4
    Global Moderator OxShoeDrew's Avatar
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    Jeff, did you put wax on your USA button?

  5. #5
    Thanks Drew and Lodge Scent. British Museum uses RenWax (according to the can of it I got). It doesn't really state that it comes off, just that "dries hard instantly. Resists liquid spillage. Does not show finger marks".

    I will give it a shot.
    Garrett AT Pro, Garrett Waterproof Pinpointer, CTX3030 with 6,11,17" coils.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by OxShoeDrew View Post
    Jeff, did you put wax on your USA button?
    I did not Drew. The USA button got a good dousing of my wife's best hairspray. It is holding up very well. I prefer hairspray over Renwax on flaky pewter. The hairspray gets into to all the nooks and crannies and seals it up tight.

    I also started using hairspray on fragile coppers as part of the "dry" cleaning process. You've seen many times how those coppers start to dry and crack and flake almost as soon as you get them out of the ground. Last couple of coppers like that I have kept them moist until I got home. Then when I got home, I gave them a good soaking with the hairspray and let it dry. The hairspray keeps the dirt/patina matrix together. Then I take the scratch brush and basically remove one layer of dirt at a time. If I see a layer that is too dry and flaky, it gets a light spray to hold it together. I do that until I get down the remaining "green" patina. Any further "scratching" at that point will just remove what little detail was left to begin with. At that point, I break out the Ren wax and cover what ever is left on the coin...dirt and all. My goal is to keep as much detail as possible.
    Oldest find: 5,000 year old copper spearhead
    Oldest coin: 1699 William III halfpenny
    Purdiest coin: 1832 Capped Bust quarter
    Coolest find: USA button with blue threads still on shank

    "He who would search for pearls must dive below."

  7. #7
    Global Moderator OxShoeDrew's Avatar
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    ohhh I didn't realize it was pewter. I'm deciding what to do with chicken hawk.

  8. #8
    For a chicken hawk.... my first instinct would be to go with the Ren wax. But only because I haven't tried hair spray on relics like that. The advantage of hairspray is that you can easily remove it with water. You can't do that easily with Ren wax.
    Oldest find: 5,000 year old copper spearhead
    Oldest coin: 1699 William III halfpenny
    Purdiest coin: 1832 Capped Bust quarter
    Coolest find: USA button with blue threads still on shank

    "He who would search for pearls must dive below."

  9. #9
    Global Moderator aloldstuff's Avatar
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    I can agree with Jeff on applying the RenWax over the dirt. Seems to hold everything together
    V3i- Prism IV- Pro Pointer
    2020 GOAL: Any Flowing Hair coin

    TOTAL 100 YEAR OLD COINS - -280
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    Oldest U.S. Copper - 1795 Liberty Cap
    Oldest U.S. Silver - 1829 Capped Bust Dime extra large 10C
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  10. #10
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    Ren wax I usually apply liberally and allow to dry , it will get a lighter or hazy or whitish coloration when its dry . I will then buff the item with a stiff nylon or horse hair brush to create a bit of friction , this allows the wax to heat up enough to really seal the surface and you will see a nice sheen that gives some contrast to the details .

    Dan
    XP Deus Ws5 , DFX ,TDI sl -

    Click here to view my finds album

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