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Thread: Cleaning Pencils

  1. #1

    Cleaning Pencils

    Hello all.

    I would like to share with you what I think are fantastic tools when it comes to cleaning finds.

    And we are all going to spend quite some time doing so this winter as it may become impossible to go out. I am posting pictures of an Indian Head Penny that I cleaned using those pencils. The creator of those pencils actually used my pics on his website !
    They are very easy to use (just like regular pencils) and as you can see, give great results. They are also very respectful of the patina. I believe they can be a great addition to anybody's cleaning set.

    Feel free to ask me any questions you would have.

    Here is a link if you are interested : http://www.nettoyervostrouvailles.com/en/

    Happy Hunting to all !

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  2. #2
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    I'm always open to look at alternative cleaning tools , I wouldn't mine trying a set on some of the crappier indians and coppers i have just to see what they can do . I occasionally use a fiber glass scratch pen ( a similar type ) on some more stubborn coins i have , these are my "winter projects" . Thanks for posting it .
    DFX ,TDI sl -

    Click here to view my finds album

  3. #3
    Looked at your other post. You are quite the expert !
    I actually love the pencils. Just as you stated in your other post, not all methods work with all coins and their conditions/shapes.
    Whatever the method, care and patience are keys.
    The only times I tried the peroxyde method, almost every time I made a mess. I guess I am not an expert at this one !
    Last but not least, it all depends on what you are looking for in a coin. Sometimes, the less cleaning, the better. With IH, the pencils really respect the patina. This is what I really like about them.

    Here are two videos that present them better: (I actually translated them)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KET7f3Md5jQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxUeRsTHehI
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  4. #4
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taltahull View Post
    Looked at your other post. You are quite the expert !
    I actually love the pencils. Just as you stated in your other post, not all methods work with all coins and their conditions/shapes.
    Whatever the method, care and patience are keys.
    The only times I tried the peroxyde method, almost every time I made a mess. I guess I am not an expert at this one !
    Last but not least, it all depends on what you are looking for in a coin. Sometimes, the less cleaning, the better. With IH, the pencils really respect the patina. This is what I really like about them.

    Here are two videos that present them better: (I actually translated them)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KET7f3Md5jQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxUeRsTHehI
    I agree that less is usually more when it comes to coin cleaning , meaning start out with the least intrusive method and go from there as opposed to starting out with the harshest . seeing the coin's surface and its patina is important as the patina is the protective "skin" copper and bronze coins develop over time to keep its integrity . Prolonged exposure to moisture , chemicals like fertilizers and acids can undermine this patina . A good green patina under the dirt will usually mean the coin will be generally in decent shape or better but seeing a ruddy reddish or thick chalky green on the surface will usually mean there is significant damage done. I hope to try out these pencils at some time soon.

    Dan
    DFX ,TDI sl -

    Click here to view my finds album

  5. #5
    Elite Member milco's Avatar
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    I have been making my own "pencils" for awhile. I have stock of oak strips about the same size as a pencil and then I sharpen in the pencil sharpener to a point and then use them to pick at coins, works better than toothpicks.


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    Oldest silver: 1853 Half-dime & 1876S Seated Quarter / Oldest coin: 1849 US Large Cent / 1854 Upper Canada One Penny Bank Token

  6. #6
    Great milco ! Thanks for your feedback !
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  7. #7
    Ave! I cannot agree more with Taltahull's post. The effects this inexpensive 4-pack of handheld tools cannot be understated; trust me, after 25+ experience cleaning ancient coins and artifacts, I think I know what I'm talking about. For a full and complete description of these four tools and how to use them, please click the following link. These tools, when used as described, are awesome.

    https://www.nobleromancoins.com/prod...oducts_id=2682

    Best regards to all, Kevin
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  8. #8
    I use these on some of my coins and even that amazing 1808 LC I found on my Connecticut trip in March. I've been happy with the results. The trick I think is to know which coins can't be improved no matter what you do!
    Oldest Coin: 41 A.D. Roman Dupondius
    Oldest Silver Coin: 1242 Denier from Trier, Germany
    Oldest American coin: 1805 Draped Bust Large Cent
    Best Coin EVER: 1625 Escalin from Chateau Renaud, France
    Best Relics: ca. 14th C. Spur, 1500 B.C. Bronze Arrowheads
    YouTube Channel: Daddy Digger

  9. #9
    Administrator del's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaddyDigger View Post
    I use these on some of my coins and even that amazing 1808 LC I found on my Connecticut trip in March. I've been happy with the results. The trick I think is to know which coins can't be improved no matter what you do!
    Dave you have a before and after of that 1808 coin ?
    DFX ,TDI sl -

    Click here to view my finds album

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by del View Post
    Dave you have a before and after of that 1808 coin ?
    I do Dan. I'll post them when I get home from work.
    Oldest Coin: 41 A.D. Roman Dupondius
    Oldest Silver Coin: 1242 Denier from Trier, Germany
    Oldest American coin: 1805 Draped Bust Large Cent
    Best Coin EVER: 1625 Escalin from Chateau Renaud, France
    Best Relics: ca. 14th C. Spur, 1500 B.C. Bronze Arrowheads
    YouTube Channel: Daddy Digger

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